Late Facebook Response Does Not Remove Responsibility Congress and Regulators to Increase Transparency

Late Facebook Response Does Not Remove Responsibility Congress and Regulators to Increase Transparency

Americans have a right to know who is trying to influence their vote—whether hostile foreign nations like Russia, corporate front groups, or wealthy special interests. Facebook’s announcement this afternoon that it shared evidence of fake Facebook accounts and Russian political ads with Special Counsel Mueller and Congressional investigators was slow in coming but it is a step forward as are the broad brushstroke descriptions of their new policies.

  • David Vance
Statement of Common Cause President Karen Hobert Flynn

Americans have a right to know who is trying to influence their vote—whether hostile foreign nations like Russia, corporate front groups, or wealthy special interests. Facebook’s announcement this afternoon that it shared evidence of fake Facebook accounts and Russian political ads with Special Counsel Mueller and Congressional investigators was slow in coming but it is a step forward as are the broad brushstroke descriptions of their new policies. But Facebook’s voluntary actions do not lessen any obligations on Congress and the Federal Election Commission to enhance transparency rules for online political advertising, and to re-assess the legal landscape in the wake of Russia’s interference in American elections. This is an important part of the obligation our elected leaders have to put country over party and strengthen the resiliency of our democracy.