Take Action

Get Common Cause Updates

Get breaking news and updates from Common Cause.

Take Action

Hold our leaders accountable by speaking out

Volunteer

Learn how you can do more to strengthen democracy.

Donate

Make a contribution to support Common Cause today.

Find Your State

News Clips

Read stories of Common Cause in the news.

  • Filter by Issue

  • Filter by Campaign

MSNBC The Beat With Ari Melber: Watchdog: Rudy Giuliani Gave Us 'Strong Evidence' Of Violation

Trump’s lawyer Giuliani admits that Trump reimbursed Michael Cohen for the $130,000 payment to Stormy Daniels. Paul S. Ryan, VP of Policy and Litigation for Common Cause, a watchdog investigating the payment as a potential campaign finance violation, tells The Beat Giuliani’s comments strongly suggest the payment was “all about the election”.

USA Today: Trump could face more legal trouble after confirming he repaid Michael Cohen, watchdogs say

If Trump knew about Cohen's payment to Daniels but didn't disclose it on his campaign's filings with the Federal Election Commission, that could amount to a "knowing and willful" violation of election law and a criminal statute that prohibits making false statements to the government, said Paul Ryan, a top lawyer with Common Cause, which has sought federal investigations into the payoff. ... Ryan, the Common Cause lawyer, said the new development changes little about group's pending complaints with the Federal Election Commission and the Justice Department about the payoff to Daniels. "All of the facts support the conclusion that this was about the campaign," he said.

Washington Post: Giuliani said the Stormy Daniels payment was legal. Here’s what campaign finance experts said.

“That is an explicit acknowledgment that this payment was about the election and was about hiding information from voters immediately before the presidential election,” said Paul S. Ryan, vice president of policy and litigation at watchdog group Common Cause, which filed a legal claim over the payment. “That’s what makes all of this a campaign finance violation.”... Ryan, of Common Cause, said Giuliani’s comments suggested a willful violation of campaign finance law.

New York Times: Trump Says Payment to Stormy Daniels Did Not Violate Campaign Laws

Paul Seamus Ryan, vice president for policy and litigation at Common Cause, said the latest explanation of the payment — that Mr. Trump reimbursed Mr. Cohen — does not eliminate the possibility that the payment violated campaign finance laws. “A lot of contradictions coming out of Team Trump this morning,” Mr. Ryan said in an interview with The New York Times. “This payment was to influence the election,” he added. And he said new details about the payment and repayment could raise additional legal problems because it might violate campaign finance laws about straw donors that prohibit making a donation in the name of another person.

Newsweek: Trump Made Stars Out of Ethics Experts. Can Richard Painter Turn That into a Senate Seat?

“As someone who has worked on these issues for decades, I have never seen such a public interest,” Karen Hobert Flynn, president of nonpartisan government watchdog Common Cause, told Newsweek. She credits ethics experts like Painter for contributing to that interest. “Having attorneys who specialize in this, that can explain what the law says and what the administration was doing, and could do it in ways that were accessible and understandable, I think people become hungry for it,” Hobert Flynn said. She added that her group has added 40,000 small donors since Trump took office and that fundraising is up 175 percent year over year.

04.30.2018

CNN: What T-Mobile-Sprint deal could mean for wireless prices

Michael Copps, a former FCC commissioner and special adviser to the watchdog group Common Cause, said T-Mobile's strategy was a direct result of its need to compete with Verizon, Sprint and AT&T. But if competition is reduced, Copps said, T-Mobile will be less likely to think creatively about customer needs. "I don't see the benefits for consumers in a marketplace where Verizon and AT&T and new T-Mobile would be calling all the shots," said Copps, who was appointed to the FCC by President George W. Bush and also served during the Obama administration. ... Those and other expenses, like Sprint's hefty debt, could ultimately harm consumers and increase prices, Copps said. When mergers of this size go through, he said, companies put "consumer interest down even lower."

Join the movement over 1 million strong for democracy

Tell Congress: Pass the For the People Act—HR 1—to strengthen democracy.