Lesson 6

Lesson Topics: Project Proposals for Participatory Budgeting; Parliamentary Procedure

Aim: To continue crafting a participatory budget project proposal in groups and to gain a basic understanding of parliamentary procedure.

Skills to be Addressed:

  • Working with peers to create a proposal for a project to improve the city.
  • Setting goals, deadlines, and establishing individual roles in a group.
  • Parliamentary procedure

Objectives:

Students will

  • Continue collaborating with peers to create a project proposal to improve their district.
  • Understand the reasons for Parliamentary Procedure.
  • Be familiar with the basic terminology and concepts of Parliamentary Procedure.

Common Core Standards Addressed:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.B
    • Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.5
    • Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.2
    • Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.6
    • Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.2
    • Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solveproblems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

Timeframe: One 60 minute period.

Materials:

Procedure:

I. In groups, students continue working on Participatory Budgeting Project

Introduction to Parliamentary Procedure

II. Show one minute video, “Robert’s Rules Rap,” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BznWaC1uhK4

What do you think this video is about? Parliamentary Procedure, aka Robert’s Rules of Order.

  • There’s a set of rules for running meetings – meetings of all kinds – that allows everyone to be heard.
  • The rules have been used for centuries. Thomas Jefferson adapted the rules in the United States. Later, a man named Martyn Robert updated the rules, after he saw the trouble that came from chaos in a meeting.
  • Robert’s rules became the standard and are used by people holding meetings everywhere: business meetings, school board meetings, 4H Club meetings, City Council meetings,
  • The rules are also called Parliamentary Procedure.

There are four principles of parliamentary procedure:

  • Justice and courtesy for all. Why would that be important?
  • One thing at a time. Why would that be important?
  • The rule of the majority. Why would that be important?
  • The right of the minority. Why would that be important?

Learning parliamentary procedure is a little bit like learning a new language and getting used to the way people behave in a culture new to you. But learning parliamentary procedure is much easier than learning a language.  

Hand out:

  • Parliamentary Procedure “Cheat Sheet”
  • Useful Terms in Parliamentary Procedure

Go over these together or have students study them.

As practice or as a quiz on parliamentary procedure, students can use:

  • Parliamentary Procedure: Matching Terms 
  • Parliamentary Procedure: Fill in the Blanks (Answer Sheet is in Lesson 7)

Just like a language, you can only get so far in studying parliamentary procedure. You have to practice it to really learn it. Tomorrow we’ll practice, by using it in a meeting here in class. Come prepared!

III. Possible Homework:

  • Fill out worksheets on Parliamentary Procedure.
  • Continue working on Participatory Budgeting Project Proposal

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