For Immediate Release Both the MA House and Senate have passed final public records reform!

Read the MassFOIA release below!

Posted on May 25, 2016


Massachusetts House and Senate unanimously pass major public records reform; open-government groups call for swift signature by Governor

BOSTON -- In a pair of unanimous, bipartisan votes, the state House of Representatives and Senate today passed the first major reform of Massachusetts public records law in four decades, sending it to Governor Charlie Baker, who has 10 days to sign, veto, or let it become law without his signature. If signed into law by Governor Baker, the legislation would address widely criticized weaknesses in Massachusetts public records law, which make it hard for citizens to get information about how their government functions.
 
"A strong public records law is critical to democracy and our ability as citizens to hold government accountable," said Pam Wilmot, executive director of Common Cause Massachusetts. "With today’s vote, the House and the Senate made a significant commitment to transparency and freedom of information, improving open government, and moving our state a huge step forward from near last in the nation. This reform is long overdue and we hope the Governor will sign it without delay."

The bill would:

  • Set clear limits on how much money government agencies can charge for public records; 
  • Set reasonable time frames for responses to public records requests;
  • Allow municipalities to request additional time for compliance and the ability to charge higher fees to cover reasonable costs;
  • Strengthen enforcement of the law by giving courts the ability to award attorney fees to those wrongly denied access to public records.

The Massachusetts Freedom of Information Alliance--a coalition of open-government groups--praised the House and Senate and their leadership for making transparency a significant legislative priority. The coalition urged Governor Charlie Baker to sign the legislation without delay and usher in a new era of openness in Massachusetts state government.
 
"This is a great day for open government," said Carol Rose, executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. "We thank the House and the Senate for making public records reform a priority and for getting the job done. We also call on Governor Baker to do the right thing and sign the bill as soon as it reaches his desk."
 
In November, the Center for Public Integrity released a report that gave the Commonwealth an F grade on public access to government information for the second time in a row. Dozens of organizations have advocated for comprehensive public records law reform, arguing that the law is among the weakest in the country and needs updating for the digital age. State lawmakers made their last substantive amendment to the law in 1973.
 
"This bill represents a significant step forward for transparency in Massachusetts," said Bob Ambrogi, executive director of the Massachusetts Newspaper Publishers Association. "It will do a lot to improve access to public records. We hope and expect Governor Baker will prove himself to be a transparency-minded Governor by signing it into law."
 
"Massachusetts residents deserve a stronger public records law, and this bill offers many improvements. We look forward to the governor signing it into law and providing more opportunity to hold government officials accountable," said Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition.
 
The pending legislation advanced earlier in the week when a conference committee of six legislators reconciled earlier versions passed by the House and Senate. The bill passed by the House and Senate today includes provisions designed to reduce the cost of obtaining public records and ensure timely responses to information requests. In addition, by allowing courts to award attorney fees to those wrongly denied access to public information, the bill would bring Massachusetts into line with 47 other states. The new law would not make such fee awards mandatory, but would establish a presumption in favor of covering requesters’ legal costs when courts find the law has been violated. The bill also includes safety-valve mechanisms to enable municipalities to get extensions on compliance deadlines and to receive reasonable compensation when dealing with particularly complex, time-consuming requests.
 
The full bill, An Act to improve public records (now H.4333), can be found here: https://malegislature.gov/Document/Bill/189/House/H4333.pdf.
 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT:
 
Pam Wilmot, Executive Director
Common Cause Massachusetts
(617) 962-0034; pwilmot@commoncause.org

Gavi Wolfe, Legislative Counsel
American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts
(617) 482-3170 x340; gwolfe@aclum.org
 
Robert J. Ambrogi, Executive Director
Massachusetts Newspaper Publishers Association
(978) 309-9188; ambrogi@legaline.com
 
Justin Silverman, Executive Director
New England First Amendment Coalition
(774) 244-2365; justin@nefirstamendment.org

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Office: Common Cause Massachusetts, Common Cause National

Issues: Open Government

Tags: 21st Century Public Records

Common Cause is a nonpartisan grassroots organization dedicated to upholding the core values of American democracy. We work to create open, honest, and accountable government that serves the public interest; promote equal rights, opportunity, and representation for all; and empower all people to make their voices heard in the political process.

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