Legislation

  • Petition Signature Requirements

    Bill Number: SCR14-005, SCR 5 would have placed a referred measure on the fall ballot to require a geographic distribution of signatures for constitutional amendments. If enacted, it would have increased the cost of citizen initiatives and have allowed one part of the state to act as gatekeeper when the rest of the state wants to see something on the ballot. If lawmakers want to improve the initiative process, they should encourage the use of statutory citizen initiatives by protecting them from legislative changes.
    Sponsors:  (1)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Increased Transparency in Lobbyist Disclosure

    Bill Number: SB14-217, The bill gets rid of duplicative disclosure reporting, clarifies that lobbyists must disclose bill numbers, requires disclosure of annual lobbying income totals for each client and requires a lobbyist to update his/her registration within 24 hours if a client is added between disclosure statements.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Legal Standing of the Public in Open Meetings Laws

    Bill Number: HB14-1390 , HB 1390 clarifies that any member of the public has legal standing to defend our open meetings laws when they are broken by public bodies.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Signature Requirement for Constitutional Initiatives

    Bill Number: HCR14-1002, HCR 1002 would have placed a referred measure on the fall ballot to double the number of signatures required for constitutional amendments proposed by initiative process, thereby making the process more difficult for ordinary Coloradans and leaving it in place for the wealthiest interests. The bill also required a geographic distribution of signatures that would have allowed one part of the state to act as gatekeeper when the rest of the state wants to see something on the ballot.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • County Clerk Authority to Challenge Administrative Rules

    Bill Number: HB14-1354, HB 1354 allows county clerks to challenge administrative rules adopted by the Secretary of State using the Administrative Procedures Act. Without this law, clerks that believed a rule was not proper had to wait for someone else to challenge the rule or not follow the rule and wait to be sued by the Secretary of State.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Campaign Finance Contribution Limits

    Bill Number: HB 14-1335, HB 1335 allows candidates who are not affiliated with a major political party to raise the same amount in contributions as major party candidates, regardless of whether or not they have a primary election.
    Sponsors:  (2)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Internet Protocol Deregulation

    Bill Number: HB14-1329 , The bill preemptively deregulates internet based voice service. Industry and consumer advocates agree that we’re moving toward a day when all voice service will be internet based (e.g. Comcast’s Xfinity), which is why we believe oversight is needed. If you have overcharges, unreliable service or outrageous costs, there are often no alternatives in rural or even many suburban communities - and thanks to this bill the Public Utilities Commission will not be able to help you.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Telephone Deregulation

    Bill Number: HB14-1331 , This bill deregulates the telephone industry in Colorado such that the Public Utilities Commission will no longer have oversight to protect consumers from, for example, overcharges. It also releases the telephone providers from their obligation to provide service to everyone in Colorado, even as 25% still use landlines, many for medical devices that need a landline to communicate with medical personnel.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Updates to the Uniform Election Code of 1992

    Bill Number: SB14-161, SB 161 updates various provisions of the election code including: strengthening the penalties for voter fraud and conspiracy to commit fraud; improving administration by allowing counties to continuously process voter registration; expanding the emergency ballot protections to include natural disasters; and streamlining the voter registration deadlines.
    Sponsors:  (3)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Conduct of Recall Elections

    Bill Number: SB14-158, SB 158 guarantees that recall elections conducted by county clerks will be run in the same manner as other elections, with the use of mail ballots for all voters as well as in person voting at voter service and polling centers. It also aligns the deadlines in statute for conducting the recall with the deadlines that are in the Colorado constitution.
    Sponsors:  (3)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Public Testimony from Remote Locations

    Bill Number: HB14-1303 , The bill allows for remote legislative testimony, including a requirement that at least one location be on the Western Slope. The bill encourages collaboration with universities and their facilities.
    Sponsors:  (3)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Connect Colorado Broadband Act

    Bill Number: HB14-1328 , The bill allows a state subsidy currently being used to maintain telephone lines in hard to reach areas to be shifted to broadband build out. While we support this in concept, it phases out the subsidy before it even gets started, bars not for profit and local governments from participating, and guarantees oversight of the fund for industry, leaving out consumer advocates.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Suspends Colorado Election Law

    Bill Number: SB14-141, SB 141 would have suspended the provisions of the Voter Access & Modernized Elections Act (including same day registration, use of mail ballots, and establishment of in person voting locations) until 2016. If enacted, there would have been no law in place to direct the conduct of elections.
    Sponsors:  (4)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Independent Ethics Commission Restrictions

    Bill Number: HB14-1258 , The bill attempted to hold Commissioners severally and personally liable for actions of the IEC. If passed the Commissioners themselves, in their personal capacities, would have had to pay any damages to a public official if the official prevailed in a complaint alleging that his or her rights were infringed upon.
    Sponsors:  (1)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Research and Retrieval Fees for Public Records Requests

    Bill Number: HB14-1193, The bill puts a cap on the amount of money a government agency can charge a member of the public for research and retrieval of public records to $30 an hour, including at least the first hour free. Records custodians are also required to publish their fees before charging them.
    Sponsors:  (2)
    Status: Signed into law
  • Municipal and Special District Elections

    Bill Number: HB14-1164, HB 1164 sets out procedures for municipal and special district elections that are not conducted by a county clerk and recorder, clarifying that those elections do not need to be coordinated by the county clerk and can be run as polling place or mail ballot elections. If municipalities or special districts choose to coordinate, the state election law is followed.
    Sponsors:  (2)
    Status: Signed into law
  • IDs for Voting

    Bill Number: HB14-1128, HB 1128 would have eliminated several types of ID currently acceptable for voting, including utility bills, bank statements, government checks, and other government documents that have the elector’s name and address on them.
    Sponsors:  (2)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Mail Ballot Challenges

    Bill Number: SB14-079, SB 79 would have allowed any person to challenge the status of a mail ballot. The legislation did not have a fair process for evaluating challenges, and provided no due process or opportunity for voters to respond.
    Sponsors:  (1)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Mail Ballot Opt Out

    Bill Number: SB14-071, SB 71 would have established a mail ballot opt-out list, creating confusion for voters and additional administrative concerns. The law was unnecessary, as Colorado requires that voters have the option of voting in person if they prefer.
    Sponsors:  (1)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Rural Representation on the Reapportionment Commission

    Bill Number: HB14-1088, HB 1088 would have required that 7 of the 11 members represent counties with populations of 25,000 or less, representing, at a maximum, only 3.3% of the state’s population. The current appointment structure requires that each congressional district be represented, which is a more fair structure since it is based on equal population.
    Sponsors:  (2)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Voter Outreach Through Enfranchisement Act

    Bill Number: HB14-1043, This bill would have repealed key elements of Colorado’s new election law. It would have established a 22 day precinct residency requirement (forcing voters who move to vote at their old address) and allowed counties to reduce the options for in person voting.
    Sponsors:  (1)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely
  • Approval Voting

    Bill Number: HB14-1062, HB 1062 would have allowed nonpartisan local elections (like city council) to be conducted using approval voting. Approval voting allows voters to vote for all of the candidates they like, and the top vote getter is elected.
    Sponsors:  (2)
    Status: Postponed indefinitely

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